February 26

 

And to the one who does not work but believes in him who justifies the ungodly, his faith is counted as righteousness,  Romans 4:5

 

We are justified only by faith in Christ, and not by any manner of virtue or goodness of our own.

To be justified is to be approved and accepted; but a man may be said to be approved and accepted in two respects: the one is to be approved really, and the other to be approved declaratively.  Justification is twofold: it is either the acceptance and approbation of the judge itself, or the manifestation of that approbation by a sentence or judgment declared by the judge, either to our own consciences or to the world.  If justification is understood in the former sense, for the approbation itself, that is only that by which we become fit to be approved; but if it is understood in the latter sense, for the manifestation of this approbation, it is by whatever is a proper evidence of that fitness.  In the former, faith alone is concerned, because it is by that only in us that we become fit to be accepted.  In the latter, whatever is an evidence of our fitness is alike concerned.

The great and most distinguishing difference between the covenant of grace and that of works is that by the covenant of grace and that of works is that by the covenant of grace we are not thus justified by our own works, but only by faith in Jesus Christ.  It is on this account chiefly that the new covenant deserves the name of a covenant of grace, as is evident by Romans 4:16: “…therefore it is of faith, that it might be of grace.”  Therefore justification by works Galatians 1:6-7) is not an evangelical doctrine, but a legal one; it is no gospel at all.

 

 

Devotions from the Pen of Jonathan Edwards

 

Jonathan Edwards, who is considered the finest theologian America has ever produced, was known for his logical mind and warm devotion to the Lord. His exposition of Scripture remains a source of powerful edification for the church. Here are 120 excerpts from this great preacher of the word presented in a daily devotional format.  Edwards certainly was an amazing philosopher and a great theologian, but his insights into God’s Word are also down to earth, practical, and devotional.  Each devotion is based on a Scripture verse and Edwards is always careful to draw your attention to the text to be fed by God’s Word, not by man’s thoughts and imaginations.

 

It is a good resource for personal devotions or as an introduction to the thought of Edwards.  You will find comfort for the soul, encouragement and exhortations for the heart, and practical instructions for the mind.

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