Observations don’t always fit what evolutionists expect.  Darwin’s theory always wins anyway.

When you wish upon a bone:  Roger Close of Monash University looked at fossil wishbones and tried to find an evolutionary pattern.  There wasn’t any.  The furcula (wishbones) of mesozoic birds showed just as much diversity as those of modern birds, if not more so.  The article on PhysOrg summarizing Close and Rayfield’s paper in PLoS ONE did not mention transitional forms, or any pattern from simple to complex.

Close expected his research to “broaden our understanding of the functional anatomy or biomechanics of early avian evolution.”  He expected to clarify the findings in a 2002 study of wishbones by Hui, but alas, “a murkier picture seems to emerge” from his data set.  In the PhysOrg article, Close left the door open for Darwin: “While this may be interpreted as evidence that early birds flew differently to those alive today, it might equally well indicate that they had evolved different anatomical solutions to accomplish the same feats.”

Adult birds as dinosaur fetuses:  Two evolutionists, by studying the shape of bird heads and dinosaur hatchlings, came up with a new idea about the origin of birds: they are dinosaurs that never grew up.  Somehow, the first birds were dinosaurs that “sped up the clock” of embryonic development and arrested it before maturity.  As a result of what might be called the Peter Pan theory of evolution, ostriches, condors, hummingbirds and penguins were not far behind.

“What is interesting about this research is the way it illustrates evolution as a developmental phenomenon,” said Arkhat Abzhanov, associate professor at Harvard and study co-author. “By changing the developmental biology in early species, nature has produced the modern bird — an entirely new creature — and one that, with approximately 10,000 species, is today the most successful group of land vertebrates on the planet.”….

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