Ancient cave art can give modern observers a unique glimpse into the minds of people who lived long ago. Stone Age art in European caves is best known for its beautiful paintings of animals like deer, horses, and mammoths. Recently, researchers investigated seldom-studied symbols appearing non-randomly among the paintings that may indicate that Stone Age people could communicate with written symbols.

The University of Victoria’s Genevieve von Petzinger and April Nowell catalogued 26 specific markings, including a hand, a wavy line, and a spiral. They even found matching markings on some Ice Age jewelry.

The problem is that if these previously overlooked patterns do represent some form of writing, then they appear “25,000 years earlier” than when researchers believed writing originated.1 Some of the cave markings are supposedly 30,000 years old.

But Scripture indicates that the very first humans were able to read and write. Adam may have even signed his own name at the end of his written portion of Genesis, recorded as “This is the book of the generations of Adam.”2

The Observer reported:

This testimony on rock walls – in daubs of ochre and charcoal mixed with spittle and fat – shows that our hunter-gatherer ancestors could depict the world around them in a startlingly sophisticated way. As the art critic John Berger once said of these painters, they appear to have had “grace from the start”.1

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