Secular scientists are excited about the recent detection of seven Earth-size planets in the constellation Aquarius, a nearby solar system. According to the report, three of the planets orbit a parent star, called TRAPPIST-1, at a distance that would allow water to exist on their surface.1

Many evolutionists are giddy with the suggestion that life on one or more of these planets is just around the corner. But this wholly unwarranted extrapolation lies far beyond the known facts. Just because a planet may be positioned for surface water to exist doesn’t mean water is there. Even if liquid water is present does not mean complex organic life is even remotely possible. Evolutionists know the serious biochemical problems of getting life to arise spontaneously from an aquatic environment. Water’s structure causes interfering side reactions that would prevent, not promote, the simplistic “just add water” idea of life’s origin. In addition, spontaneous-forming molecules could never put themselves together to produce a living cell; such an event requires purpose, plan, and special creation. Such an event is nothing less than miraculous.

Exoplanets (planets orbiting a star different from our Sun) have a less than stellar track record when it comes to harboring life. The reasons are legion.2 For starters, there are dozens of habitability requirements that need be followed to the letter in order for life to exist and thrive.

Regardless, NASA chief scientist Thomas Zurbuchen said, “The discovery gives us a hint that finding a second Earth is not just a matter of if, but when.”1 Other evolutionary scientists might contest such effusive optimism with a long list of sobering habitability zone requirements:

 

 

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