The tiny black flecks found in granite testify to a powerful and recent worldwide Flood. But you have to look closely.

Most people are familiar with granite. Several famous cliffs are made of granite, such as the sheer towering cliffs on either side of the Yosemite Valley—El Capitan and Half Dome (Figure 1). In other places granites cover the ground with large rounded boulders, such as the Devil’s Marbles in central Australia (Figure 2).

We also see granites used for countertops in many home kitchens. Their colorful, interlocking crystals give the rock an elegant, sought-after flecked appearance (Figure 3). Along with glassy, pink, and cream crystals, granites usually contain scattered flakes of a dark, shiny mineral called biotite.

These are more than just pretty rocks. They have amazing stories to tell. Just one of those stories has to do with the flakes of biotite. Sometime during the Flood, these flakes were damaged at the atomic level. If we can piece together their story, these flakes can tell us more about the forces that God used to judge the earth during the Flood—and to form new granites from molten conditions in only hours or days, not millions of years.

But to investigate that story requires a bit of background on that tiny black mineral found in granite. The first article in this three-part series explains a few things we can learn about a rock’s history by looking at it under a microscope. God placed phenomenal clues in nature about the Flood’s history, if we only know where to look. Understanding these evidences helps us to glorify “the God of the hills” (1 Kings 20:28).

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