A recent paper that was published in the journal Nature uniquely illustrates the Creator’s hand in plant development.1 This research clearly shows how suites of protein-coding genes are turned on and off during embryogenesis—the process of generating a plant embryo or seed. The genes are unique to that specific kind of organism and follow an expertly designed progression of gene expression that roundly refutes evolutionary presuppositions.

In the mind of an evolutionist, genes with similar DNA sequences across diverse types of organisms are called “highly conserved” and are thought to be ancient (derived from distant ancestors). In light of intelligent design principles, similar genes across diverse organisms serve as basic engineered units working in common core biochemical functions.

Further, evolutionists refer to genes that are very different between organisms as more “highly evolved” or “recently derived.” In a creation-based model, these genes are likely to represent the genetic uniqueness that God chose to characterize each created kind.

For this study, geneticists experimented on a small mustard-like plant that has been widely used in research.2 They examined two classes of protein-coding genes—”ancient” and “recent” (otherwise known as “core” and “unique”)—and tracked their levels of expression across the different stages of plant embryo development.

In a traditional Darwinian scenario, one would expect the “ancient genes” to predominate early in development and then generally faze to more evolutionarily advanced “young” genes. However, in this study, the “ancient genes” exhibited a fairly constant expression across the stages of development….

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