Evidence for tropical trees has been found 5 km deep off the coast of Antarctica.

The BBC News reported that explorers dropped a drill rig 4 km down into the ocean off the east coast of Antarctica, then drilled another kilometer through sediment.  The drill core included pollen grains of palm, and trees resembling baobab and macadamia.  Remnants of single-celled archaea were also found.“The lowland coastal region sported palm trees, while slightly inland, hills were populated with beech trees and conifers,” the article said.

The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) dates the sediments as Eocene, 53 million years old in the evolutionary timeline.  The researchers infer from the flora that global temperatures were some 5°C warmer than today.  That would have created no sharp division between the poles and equator. Even in the darkest part of winter, temperatures at the poles probably did not drop below 10°C (50°F).

“The early Eocene was a period of atmospheric CO2 concentrations higher than the current 390 parts per million (ppm)—reaching at least 600 ppm and possibly far higher,” the article said.   Scientists believe this data can help improve computerized climate models.  Even though the article claimed that “Eocene represents heightened levels of CO2 that will not be reached any time soon, and may not be reached at all if CO2 emissions abate,” it ended by arguing that current climate models are making good predictions of future warming.

The BBC News posted an audio clip about the find from one of the IODP members.

Well, isn’t this remarkable.  First of all, what’s the worry about human-caused global warming if it got much warmer in the past when evolutionists say people weren’t around?  Obviously all the land animals and plants survived this episode, including the living fossils that are so delicate they tell us humans are making them go extinct….

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