by Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D., & Brian Thomas, M.S.

Most evolutionists who study fossil mollusks believe these creatures evolved from a hypothetical ancestor that had no shell. How could nature, with no intelligent input, coax imagined soft-bodied ancestors to blindly construct the hard shells of oysters, which research now shows contain over 250 different proteins?1

A large team of scientists recently helped answer this question by sequencing the genome of the Pacific oyster.1 They not only uncovered the complicated genetic and cellular requirements for building an oyster shell, but also many other key features that defy evolutionary preconceptions.

Perhaps one of the most amazing aspects of the oyster genome is its vast gene repertoire. Humans have about 21,000 genes, but the team found that oysters use over 28,000 genes. When compared to seven other animal genomes, the researchers found 8,654 genes that only oysters have.

Because oysters are not highly mobile creatures and live in challenging and fluctuating environments—like estuaries and intertidal zones—they need a large suite of genes that allow them to adapt to changes in air exposure, toxins, temperature, and salinity. Indeed, the researchers identified 7,938 genes that contribute to genetically programmed environmental adaptation, which is a key component of the creation biological origins model.

Traditional thought suggests that adjacent cells excrete the proteins and minerals that build oyster shells. But one of the least expected discoveries from the project was the complicated biology of shell formation. Of the 259 proteins found to play a structural role in oyster shells, 84 percent were not excreted proteins. How could the shell be excreted if its proteins were not excreted?….

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