Animal and plant cell DNA is so complicated that all the cellular machines that process, regulate, and manipulate it are constantly in need of cellular fuel. In fact, each animal and plant cell uses so much fuel that specialized fuel-production facilities called mitochondria are required.

A new evolutionary study attempted to provide evidence supporting a bacterial origin for mitochondria, but all it really did was beg the question.

Evolutionary scenarios for mitochondrial origins are faced with a problem: The cell must utilize its DNA in order to live. But this in turn requires an energy factory. Without either the energy or DNA factories, the cell would die. Thus, both factories, in full form, are required for plant and animal life.1

Charles Darwin and his contemporaries knew almost nothing of cellular components, or their intricate and interdependent arrangements. They considered cells to be simple, making it easier to imagine that cells were built up through long, slow, gradual, natural processes. But all-or-nothing systems that characterize cells cannot be the result of such gradualism, since a half-developed factory somewhere along its evolutionary development would do a cell no good at all.

Therefore, evolutionists propose that mitochondria resulted from a one-off fusion event that occurred when one bacterium engulfed another. At some point, the engulfed bacterium then supposedly became a mitochondrion.

The little evidence used to support this story, however, is trumped by the overwhelming evidence against it.

For example, the structure and function of bacteria’s protein-manufacturing machines have too many core differences from those that perform the same function in plants and animals. So, evolutionists think that the bacteria’s version must have morphed into the plant/animal version near the time when the bacteria was supposedly engulfed.

But as molecular biologist Daniel Criswell has shown, the bacterial protein-manufacturing apparatus couldn’t function in this scenario because the myriad structural changes required to transform it into the mitochondrial version would render the transitional mitochondrion temporarily useless.2 And without the ability to manufacture proteins in the meantime, the imaginary cell would have died, ending the whole evolutionary experiment….

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