Recently, evolutionists discovered “microfossils up to almost 4.3 billion years old” in Canada.1 Their article states:

“It shows that some microbes have not changed significantly” since Earth’s early times, Papineau said. Earth formed about 4.5 billion years ago and the oceans appeared about 4.4 billion years ago. If the fossils are indeed 4.28 billion years old, that would suggest “an almost instantaneous emergence of life” after ocean formation, Dodd said.1

It is significant that these fossil microbes apparently didn’t change after four billion years—but evolution implies many, many changes over millions of years. If evolution involves substantial change, then why are these ancient microfossils so similar to modern microbes?

The article states the microbes “are similar to the bacteria that thrive today around sea floor hydrothermal vents” and “hydrothermal vents spewing hot water may have been the cradle of life on Earth relatively soon after the planet formed.” This brings us to a second point: The hardy life forms clustered around today’s hydrothermal vents are called extremophiles. They can survive punishing temperatures, high pressure, and toxic chemicals. Were these the first forms of life on Earth—having been fashioned by time, chance, and natural processes? In our advanced 21st century, secular biologists are still unaware of life’s origin:

How did cells arise? Of all the major questions posed by biologists, this question may be the least likely ever to be answered.2

Read more at ICR

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