Microbiologists contend that instead of increasing complexity, evolution of some systems—like interdependent microbial communities—can occur by losing complexity. How accurate or meaningful is this new idea about “reductive evolution,” whereby life evolves by losing genes?1

The authors described their new hypothesis of evolution in the online journal mBio. They formulated this reductive evolution concept after they observed ocean-living bacteria losing genetic information.

The bacteria lost particular vital functions by somehow letting go of the genes that aided those functions. The bacteria survived by relying on nearby microbes to perform that vital task for them. Without devoting resources to that function, the bacteria are free to perform other roles more economically.

To these evolutionists, when bacteria lose genes, “reductive genome evolution” is occurring. But they admitted, “There is a tendency in evolutionary discourse to describe life’s history as a progression towards increasing complexity.” So has evolutionary discourse been misguided? Instead of simple-to-complex, was life’s history instead filled with complex-to-simple evolutionary changes such as bacteria losing certain genes?

Life’s history is often described as a progression because without a Creator, transforming hydrogen into humans required some kind of natural progression. One cannot climb a hill by falling down a hole….

Continue Reading on www.icr.org