Evolutionists have yet to figure out how life could have spontaneously developed from non-living chemicals. Richard Dawkins told New Scientist in 2009 that “the most profound unsolved problem in biology is the origin of life itself.”1

Stanford University recently claimed that a team of its geologists “hasn’t quite solved the problem, but they’ve come closer.”2 However, such rhetoric is misleading because the researchers’ new ideas add no real hope for a naturalistic origin for life.

The team speculated that the chemicals of life could have coalesced, concentrated, and coordinated themselves into a reproducing proto-cell in microscopic “pore spaces” found in serpentinite, which is a rock type that comprises some deep ocean vents. The researchers guessed that the rock walls of the tiny pores could have protected the chemicals they contained, perhaps even allowing “the resultant organisms to survive without cell membranes.”2

How feasible is that, really?

According to a university new release, “this model of life’s origins is only feasible under very specific conditions. Serpentinite, a cool Earth, and an acidic ocean all must have coexisted for a time.”2 But many more specific conditions would have been required, including an intelligent designer. For example, the chemical building blocks of RNA—nucleotides named Adenine-5′-triphosphate, G-5′-triphosphate , C-5′-triphosphate, and Uracil-5′-triphosphate—do not all occur naturally. And when they are exposed to nature, they quickly break down….

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