If by definition something can never come from nothing, how could anything exist unless Someone put it there? This question has been used as a classic argument for the existence of God—an argument that theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss tries to tackle in his new book, A Universe from Nothing. Although the book’s counterarguments were designed to close the door on God, they actually distill to failed atheist tactics.

Krauss, fully convinced of the Big Bang, asserted that recent scientific discoveries show that something actually can come from nothing, and that the universe and all its laws did come from nothing. He wrote:

Everyone (with the exception of certain school boards in the United States) now knows that the universe is not static but is expanding and that the expansion began in an incredibly hot, dense Big Bang approximately 13.72 billion years ago.1

“There is a valuable lesson here,” he continued. “As [Belgian priest and astronomer Georges] Lemaitre recognized, whether or not the Big Bang really happened is a scientific question, not a theological one.”1 This lesson certainly is important, but not because it is true—it is, in fact, exactly wrong. Its importance lies in the author’s misuse of it to promote faith in God’s non-existence.

In this bait-and-switch tactic, Krauss tried to covertly transpose the question of ultimate origins from the realms of theology and philosophy to the realm of science. This way, he can claim authority on the matter and then dictate its terms….

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