The solar system is packed with wonders, from examples of geometric precision to evidences of a youthful origin. For over a century, some astronomers have theorized that the sun, planets, moons, and comets of the solar system all coalesced from a single massive swirling cloud of space dust or debris. This “nebular hypothesis” has encountered a multitude of insurmountable challenges,1 and new data provided by NASA have added yet another puzzle it cannot solve.

Among the questions the hypothesis fails to answer are where the initial debris came from, how it separated from nearby suns, and what started its spinning motion. The nebular hypothesis also fails to explain how the dust overcame its natural repulsive force to be compressed into planets or the sun, why Venus and Uranus rotate in an opposite direction to the other planets, and why the combination of elements like iron, nickel, or carbon is unique to each planet. If they all had the same source, they should be comprised of similar components.

Now, a new analysis published in Science may have flunked the nebular hypothesis completely. NASA’s 2004 Genesis mission was able to capture samples of solar wind containing debris from the outer layer of the sun. Researchers used the data to analyze oxygen concentrations between the sun, earth, moon, and meteorites, including meteorites from Mars….

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