It has always been impossibly difficult for astronomers to realistically explain how galaxies, stars, and planets might have formed through natural processes. To prop up their naturalistic theories, they will sometimes invent unobserved structures, such as the Oort cloud for comets.1

More recently, astronomers conjured an unknown massive planet that was supposedly responsible for placing Uranus and Neptune in their unique paths around the sun. However, the fictional planet is still a woefully insufficient cause for today’s planetary orbits.

The extra planet was proposed because cosmologists have had a miserable time trying to model the evolution of the solar system’s four gas giant planets from a huge, unorganized dust disc.2 The recent modeling effort, partly funded by the National Science Foundation, defined a “successful” attempt very loosely.

First, the outcome had to result in four giant planets that correspond to the four outer gaseous planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. So far, that makes sense.

But second, the four planets in the model only needed to have orbits that merely resembled, rather than exactly matching, those of the real planets. And the study’s resemblance tolerances were broad. For example, the researchers only required the semimajor axis [the longest radius of an orbit] of each resulting planet to be “within 20% to its present value.”3

Third, since they had such poor luck achieving Jupiter’s current amplitude, the scientists settled for “at least half of its current value.” The study’s author wrote, “The overall success rate for the criterion C [achieving the correct amplitude] was disappointingly low,” even with that extra fifth fictional planet added to the simulations.3….

Continue Reading on www.icr.org