by Brian Thomas, M.S.

A husband and wife don’t always see eye-to-eye. Sometimes this is simply because they have differing preferences, but often it is because they are wired with differing thinking patterns. Researchers now report how brain structure differences between men and women appear to relate to vision differences.

The study results appeared in two papers in the online journal Biology of Sex Differences.Lead author Israel Abramov said, “As with other senses, such as hearing and the olfactory system, there are marked sex differences in vision between men and women.”2

For example, the study confirmed that women are better at distinguishing colors than men. But men, who have 25 percent more neurons in the visual cortex, have more sensitivity to fine detail and rapidly moving images. Also, the two sexes recognized the same hue, but at slightly different wavelengths.

Who has not suffered an argument with the opposite gender that sounds like, “No, that’s not green—that’s more like turquoise”? This research shows that what looks green to one gender may not appear identical to the other. Unless the two agree to validate the other’s perception, the argument over color might persist indefinitely!

Why are men and women different in the way they perceive the world and process and communicate information? Could nature have selected these trait differences? If so, how would these differences contribute to survival? Abramov apparently has no answers to these questions. “The evolutionary driving force between these differences is less clear,” he said.2….

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