Sir Isaac Newton is recognized by many as perhaps the greatest scientist who ever lived. But few know “that Newton was also a Christian and a Bible scholar.”1 In fact, he wrote more about Scripture than about science, and finally after 300 years, his theological works are now available online for all to see.

The National Library of Israel digitized his theological notes and papers, originally handwritten with flowing penmanship on parchment. “These papers introduce facets of Newton’s personality and work that the public has never before encountered,” according to the National Library’s introduction to the Newton collection.2

For example, few may know Newton’s perspective on Bible study. In one paper, he wrote, “But search the scriptures thy self and that by frequent reading and constant meditation upon what thou readest and earnest prayer to God to enlighten thine understanding if thou desirest to find the truth.”3

Modern physics textbooks teach Newton’s laws of motion, but students are not generally exposed to his prescription for truth discovery. Why have secularized, modern cultures emphasized and valued Newton’s scientific contributions, yet downplayed and devalued his theological contributions?

Milka Levy-Rubin of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Department of History told the Associated Press:

Today, we tend to make a distinction between science and faith, but to Newton it was all part of the same world. He believed that careful study of holy texts was a type of science, that if analyzed correctly could predict what was to come.4….

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