The ICR life sciences team has completed the second phase of its project comparing human and chimp DNA sequence. As we reported in a previous research column, 40,000 purportedly random chimpanzee DNA sequences were obtained from the National Center for Biotechnology (NCBI).1, 2 The chimp sequences (740 nucleotides each on average) were compared to four different versions of the human genome using the commonly employed genetic algorithm called BLASTN.3

As indicated in the first part of the study, 15 different experiments testing a comprehensive set of algorithm parameters were performed. These involved 600,000 attempted alignments between the chimp sequences and the human genome. In this set of experiments, no low-complexity sequence masking was performed. All of the available DNA sequence was tested and none of it was excluded.

The masking of low-complexity DNA sequence is a feature that is typically utilized by evolutionists when they compare DNA. Masking supposedly removes the non-coding portions of the genome that are not conducive to evolutionary results. However, science has proven that the entire human genome is functional and virtually every region is critical to cell life.4, 5Additionally, evolutionists are now reversing themselves and claiming that the non-coding DNA is where important features related to human evolution are located and, thus, are important areas to study as well.6

Nevertheless, in the second phase of our human-chimp experiments, the 600,000 alignments of the first phase were completely repeated while using low-complexity sequence masking. As a result, a sum total of 1.2 million attempted alignments between the chimp and human genomes was performed, generating one of the most comprehensive genome-wide DNA sequence similarity studies ever conducted between chimp and human. The results and conclusions in their entirety are currently being published in the Answers Research Journal and should be available online at answersingenesis.org/arj in the near future….

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