In environmental lingo, what could be greener than a tree?  And what is more despised by many environmentalists than chemical companies, especially the pharmaceutical and pesticide industries?  Maybe we should take a tip from plants.  They are not just environmentally friendly, they produce a myriad of complex compounds that are slowly finding their way into healthful products—and evolutionists have no idea how they do it.

Low-hanging fruit.  We know the phrase, “going after the low-hanging fruit.”  It means doing the easy tasks first.  Why, then, did PhysOrg title an article, “Nature reaches for the high-hanging fruit”?  Consider this strange introductory paragraph that affirms evolution then turns around and denies evidence for it:

In the first study of its kind, researchers have used tools of paleontology to gain new insights into the diversity of natural plant chemicals. They have shown that during the evolution of these compounds nature doesn’t settle for the ‘low-hanging fruit’ but favours rarer, harder to synthesise forms, giving pointers that will help in the search for potent new drugs.

The study is the work by a team from four institutions that used “theoretical morphology” (the art of comparing mathematically-simulated forms to living forms, such as a conch shell) to the investigation of terpenes, a group of natural products produced by plants.  Terpenes have proven useful to man.  Examples include anti-cancer drugs like taxol, fragrances, and flavorings.

“The big question is how plants have evolved to make these chemicals,” said Dr ÓMáille of the John Innes Centre and the Institute of Food Research.  “Is there a physical explanation, based on the chemical reaction, for why certain terpenes are favoured? Are plants simply making the easy to synthesize low hanging fruit of the terpene chemical world?”….

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