If dinosaurs evolved into birds, then fossils should show plenty of sequential transitional features between the two groups. For example, some evolutionists speculate that the earliest stages of feather evolution consisted of filaments, or “dinofuzz,” on dinosaurs’ skin.

ScienceNOW reported that researchers led by paleontologist Ryan McKellar have found just this kind of material in Canadian ambers.1 In their study published in Science, his team wrote, “Eleven feather or protofeather specimens were recovered by screening over 4000 Grassy Lake amber inclusions.”2 But based on scientific observations, there’s a good chance that these finds have nothing to do with dinosaurs at all.

The amber samples were assigned to Late Cretaceous deposits, which are systematically provided an age of at least 65 million years.3 However, the amber was still transparent, indicating that it is thousands and not millions of years old.4 Translucent amber cannot contain anything from some evolutionary dinosaur age, because oxidation would have long since darkened it.

If dinosaurs evolved into birds, then protofeathers should be found on dinosaur fossils located below (and therefore dated before) fossils of birds, not above and after them. McKellar’s fibers came from Cretaceous deposits, but true bird feathers have been found in fossil layers far below the Cretaceous. Why would feathers still be evolving long after they supposedly already existed?

Yale University’s Richard Prum told ScienceNOW:

The lack of any other remains in the amber—a distinctive bit of bone, say, or a shred of skin—leaves open the possibility that the structures aren’t associated with dinosaurs at all. Indeed…they could be something completely new that hasn’t been preserved elsewhere in the fossil record.1….

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