Conventional geology assumes that different rock layers represent different periods of time. Paleontologists assess the age of fossilized creatures by the rock layers in which they are found. So, a fossil found in a lower rock layer is considered to have lived in a much earlier time than one found in a higher (“younger”) stratum.

But frequently, fossils of the same creatures are discovered in rock layers far above or below the layers in which they were initially found. Very often, they are discovered in almost exactly the same form in both places, and they even look just like their living counterparts.1 That forces evolutionary scientists to constantly reassess the time periods assigned to fossilized life forms.

The Institute for Creation Research has reported on several fossil discoveries that have challenged conventional evolutionary timescales, including a spider web trapped in an amber deposit that was located in a rock layer supposedly 100 million years older than the time spiders were assumed to have evolved.1 And the web was just like that made by orb-weavers today.

Another example is the discovery in Japan of a fossilized tooth of what was essentially a smallT. rex. Such a find would not normally make headlines, but this tooth was located in a rock layer that predated the assigned T. rex “age” by 60 million years.2….

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