by Frank Sherwin, M.A.

A recent issue of the secular science journal Nature includes research by molecular palaeobiologist Kevin Peterson in which he questions the traditional evolutionary tree of mammals, stating it is all wrong.1 The data Peterson uses are based on a molecule called microRNA (miRNA). This is just one of several kinds of ribonucleic acids that control the expression of genes. Peterson’s miRNA interpretation breaks away from the traditional Darwinian view that people are more closely related to cows, dogs, and elephants than to rodents. The article goes on to say:

If it turns out that the traditional mammal tree is right, Peterson won’t see that result as a defeat for microRNAs. It would just mean that something odd happened…he says.1

“Something odd happened”? Imagine if a non-Darwinian scientist stated this in a creation science publication! How did such a bizarre statement ever make it into a journal that allegedly prides itself on its scientific precision? Meanwhile, the origin of mammal groups, miRNA notwithstanding, is contentious: “But the exact origins of modern cats, dogs, bears and seals are still controversial.”2

An April 2012 University of Wisconsin-Madison press release says that “something happened” regarding the cryptic Cambrian explosion:

The oceans teemed with life 600 million years ago, but the simple, soft-bodied creatures would have been hardly recognizable as the ancestors of nearly all animals on Earth today. Then something happened…a burst of evolution led to a flurry of diversification and increasing complexity, including the expansion of multicellular organisms and the appearance of the first shells and skeletons.3

Creation scientists suggest that if the world suffered a global flood 4,500 years ago, then the multitude of sophisticated ocean bottom-dwelling creatures (including those that are indeed 100-percent fish) found at the base of the Cambrian is to be expected. Evolutionists will have none of that, of course, and are driven to say—with a wave of the hand—only that “something happened,” and then proceed to use vague words such as “burst,” “flurry,” and “appearance.”

We find evolutionists are not averse to appealing to miracles to make their “rock-solid” case for evolution: “In the 50 million years between agnathan and chondrichithian divergence, something mysterious, even miraculous occurred: the adaptive immune system evolved.”4“Miraculous”? How did such blatantly unscientific language made it past the editorial review process?…

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