Scientists have known for a while that dolphins use vision and sonar to find food and identify objects. But researchers recently discovered that dolphins also have electricsensory perception. After decades of dolphin studies, why had this incredible feature not already been discovered?

Dolphins can’t always rely on their eyesight, especially when working in murky water, so they have been equipped with sonar systems that are tuned to expertly and accurately interpret whether signals represent food, friend, or foe. But sonar signals are not very effective at close range, and researchers have established that at least one species of dolphin can sense electric fields using a technique called electroreception.1 Animals generate weak electric fields when they use their muscles, and these dolphins can sense those weak signals in close quarters with special pits on their beaks.

Discoveries of new sensory capabilities like these are ongoing. For example, in 2009 investigators found that seals can use their whiskers to “read” subtle underwater eddies that trail behind fast-swimming fish.2 And a separate study reported that certain shrimp eyes can detect twelve primary colors (compared with humans’ ability to see three), and that may lead to advances in light-reading technology.3

Evolutionists have a distinct challenge in trying to explain how these sensory capabilities—more miniaturized and effective than any of their man-made facsimiles—could have come from any non-intelligent source. In contrast, biblical creationists are willing to consider the most straightforward, and therefore the most scientific, explanation: Superior creations imply a superior creator….

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