Evolution is hard-pressed to explain this prickly little digger. That’s because the Creator made it like no other single animal.

You might think that spiky little animal waddling along the forest floor is a porcupine. But it has a long, sticky tongue and it digs for ants, so maybe it’s some kind of anteater. Nope? Well, it’s a mammal, at least, right? Wait—it lays eggs. Mammals don’t lay eggs. So what is this thing?

The echidna seems to break all the rules. It’s a mammal, but it lays eggs. It’s warm-blooded, but it has a low body temperature. It lives on land, but it detects food like some fish do. And, like so many other rule-breakers, such as the platypus, the echidna settled in Australia.

Evolutionists have always had trouble explaining how it’s related to any other animal. So instead, to explain its oddities they invoke “convergent evolution” (the belief that a similar “need” produces similar designs in completely unrelated animals). But creationists understand that the echidna’s traits point to a Creator who made many unique kinds of animals.

Short-beaked echidnas roam the wilds of Australia’s outback and range all the way up into the southwestern portion of New Guinea. Covered in hair with keratin spines all over their backs, these critters are about as big as a housecat, between 12 and 18 inches (30–45 cm) long, and weigh 4.5–15.5 pounds (2–7 kg).

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