Human evolution theory has been dealt more body blows this month, raising questions whether it can sustain any more injuries after a decade of repeated punches and concussions.  How many times can a theory take the “everything you know is wrong” body slam? (E.g., 2/19/2004,10/2/2009, 4/8/2010, 10/28/2010.) We’ve already seen Neanderthals promoted to fully human status (8/12/2011).  Now, some evolutionists are claiming that the “missing links” on the way to modern humans were all interfertile with us.

More Neanderthal revision:  The BBC News reported on work in the Jersey Cave that indicates “Neanderthals have been widely under-estimated.”  The individuals portrayed since Darwin as brutish pre-humans are now being seen (once again) as intelligent, resourceful, well-adapted, tool-making, successful members of Homo sapiens that would probably put moderns to shame in many ways.  That’s all academic, though, since genetic studies recently indicated significant interbreeding between Neanderthals and “modern” humans (8/12/2011).  Svante Pääbo, the “man rewriting human evolution,” was interviewed by New Scientist.  To the question “Does the discovery of the Denisovans raise the possibility that we once shared the planet with other types of extinct human?” he answered, “Yes.”  He also agrees that Homo floresiensis, the “Hobbits” of Indonesia, are probably “an early divergence from modern humans.”

Homo erectus tool shop:  Another find repeats the “earlier than thought” meme frequently found in evolutionary reporting.  Science Daily said, “A new study suggests that Homo erectus, a precursor to modern humans, was using advanced toolmaking methods in East Africa 1.8 million years ago, at least 300,000 years earlier than previously thought.”  The article absorbed the damage to evolutionary theory with the following understatement: “The study…raises new questions about where these tall and slender early humans originated and how they developed sophisticated tool-making technology.”

In addition, the article stated that the discovery of so-called Acheulian tools, “a great technological leap” for this group, does not resolve other debates about where Homo erectusoriginated – Africa or Asia.  One of the researchers was “taken aback” by the discovery of advanced tools at “the oldest Acheulian site in the world” just six miles from where Richard Leakey found “Turkana Boy” in 1984 that was announced at the time as a missing link (see Penn State article).  The BBC News described Acheulian stone tools as the “Swiss army knives” of the Stone Age, useful for both cutting up heavy animals and chopping wood.

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