Teachers and Christian leaders often encourage students to question things, for this can be a real impetus to growth. There’s nothing wrong with asking questions or even with having doubts, for they often expose wrong information and encourage further study. As it relates to Scripture, there will always be a good answer, even if an initial lack of ready answers requires that we shelve the question for a future time. Our faith in the Word of God should be firm.

For a Christian, questions regarding evolution’s claims should lead to greater understanding, or a postponement of answers—not to disbelief. As they relate to evolution and the Flood, we have answers to many difficult questions now, and have reason to believe we’ll soon have more. We’ll never have all the answers this side of eternity, but there’s no need to disbelieve.

Unfortunately for our theological forefathers in the 1800s, their doubts led to unbelief, and soon pages were being ripped from Scripture. In those important decades, Charles Lyell and others championed the questions, insisting that the Bible could not be believed, and many Christian leaders caved in. Scientists minimized the impact of Lyellian-inspired compromise in the church by holding fast to creation and Flood doctrines, but the appeal of more autonomy from Scripture came to full flower when Darwin proposed his views.

Striving to accommodate long ages and evolution to Scripture, ardent Bible-believing Christians proposed various ways to incorporate them, concepts that still plague Christianity today. Those holding a higher view of Scripture gravitated to the gap theory, which places long ages between the first two verses of Genesis 1, followed by global destruction due to Satan’s fall and six days of re-creation. This allowed Christians to embrace both Christianity and long-age evolution.

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