What can explain all the circumstances of the cosmos—why small changes happen, why big changes happen, how life supposedly evolved from non-life, and the fundamental structure of chemicals and atoms? According to microbiologist Erik Andrulis of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, the key to the universe is the gyre.

The what?

Publishing in the online journal Life, Andrulis used over 100 pages to define dozens of newly invented words and to describe how atoms, molecules, cell systems, ecosystems, and the solar system are made of shape-shifting circular vortices called gyres.

Supposedly, when smaller gyres collapsed in synchrony with other gyres long ago, they naturally formed larger and more complex systems. Andrulis called this process “complexifying,” and he claimed that simple chemicals coalesced in just the right way to form life when collapsing gyres formed gyres-within-gyres.

His bold break with standard thinking may spur some of his readers to approach old problems in new, refreshing ways. However, the author’s claims far surpass his theory’s actual explanatory power.

Perhaps atoms are made of some kind of gyre-like, rotating, ring-shape energy. And planets certainly do revolve around the sun in the solar system. But similar behaviors between different systems is not to be confused with similar, naturally caused origins of those systems. Bicycles and cars both use rotating wheels, but intelligent people invented them, not gyres.

Andrulis mixed scientific-sounding concepts with Eastern religion, and he even credited sages for inspiration….

Continue Reading on www.icr.org