When secular scientists assume that fossil-bearing sedimentary rock layers are records of bygone eras, they encounter a sticky conundrum. The lowest fossil-rich rock layers, called Cambrian rocks, have all the basic types (phyla) of creatures, plus many extinct types. But hardly any fossils exist in the Precambrian or “Ediacaran” layers immediately below them. How could all those creatures have evolved so rapidly from so few predecessors? After decades of attempts, evolutionists still have not adequately explained how all major life forms suddenly appeared in the Cambrian explosion of life, supposedly requiring “only” five million years or so.

Darwin taught that environments shape creatures through natural selection. But one recent study of Precambrian worm burrows shows the futility behind thoughts of natural conditions generating creatures and of rock layers representing separate epochs instead of successive Flood layers.1

The animals that made the fossilized worm burrows in Yakutia, Russia, were clearly equipped for burrowing, and the team of Russian paleontologists who wrote about them in Geology described them as organisms that “actively burrowed by peristalsis,”2 which is a coordinated wavelike contraction of both longitudinal and transverse muscles. The esophagus uses this method when swallowing, caterpillars use it when crawling, and worms living on the seafloor use it when burrowing.

So, do the worms help explain how all those living phyla evolved in only a few million supposed years between the Ediacaran and the Cambrian?

Continue Reading on www.icr.org