Prevailing secular theory considers birds to be living dinosaurs, but new science is hatching to support the stark differences between these creatures. The data demonstrate dinosaurs were more likely cold-blooded like all modern reptiles.

Dr. Gregory Erickson of Florida State University and his colleagues from the University of Calgary and the American Museum of Natural History recently published their findings on dinosaur incubation periods in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.1 They found that dinosaur eggs took roughly twice as long to hatch as comparable bird eggs.

How did they determine the exact incubation times? The team discovered that embryonic dinosaurs had incremental layers of von Ebner gland protein in their developing teeth that formed growth lines, much like tree rings.1 But these rings developed during diurnal pulses of mineralization, giving a record of daily growth. These same teeth growth lines are present in today’s reptiles and mammals but were never known from dinosaur fossils prior to this Erickson study. The scientists merely counted the growth lines in the fossil teeth to determine embryonic age, conducting their research on two species of dinosaur, Protoceratops andrewsi (a frilled dinosaur) and Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (a duckbill variety).1

It has long been known that “In reptiles incubation is slow, whereas in birds it is remarkably rapid.”1 Because many secular scientists assume dinosaurs are similar to extinct birds, they readily infer dinosaurs also had rapid incubation periods.1

Read more at ICR

Continue Reading on