Portions of a fossilized eleven-foot-long snake were discovered encased in sandstone amidst a clutch of sauropod eggs. Other snakes of the same extinct species were found nearby, indicating that the eggs were a likely food source for them. How and when were these remains preserved?

The eggs are believed to be from a type of titanosaur, massive creatures that include a variety of species whose fossils have been found worldwide. Jeff Wilson of the University of Michigan discovered this nesting site in western India. The snake was intertwined among three eggs and one hatchling, which was less than 20 inches long.1 Wilson and three colleagues published the find in the online scientific journal PLoS Biology.

New Scientist stated that this was a “67-million-year-old hunting scene,”2 an evolutionary date derived from “marine microfossils from sequences deposited in the seaway [in central India] and correlating these strata to nearby terrestrial sequences with dinosaur remains,” according to a recent study of the area.3 Thus, the fossils were dated according to the rocks they are in, which were dated by the fossils they contain. As is usual with fossil dating among evolutionists, the circuitous logic is based on a belief in deep time, not strict scientific observation. No sure date exists within the rock itself, and thus its age is subject to wide interpretation. But there are even stronger reasons to doubt this published age, along with evolutionary theories on India’s confusing geologic past.

The fossil snake and dinosaur eggs were found in a layer that is below an immense lava formation called the Deccan Traps. Taking up an estimated 240,000 cubic miles, the vast majority of it was deposited in a single colossal fast-flowing4 pulse3 that ushered from a gash in earth’s crust called a “feeder dike.” Moreover, this seems to have occurred during a moment in earth’s history when massive volcanism, along with continent-covering water, was occurring worldwide….

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