March 20

Now to him who is able to keep you from stumbling and to present you blameless before the presence of his glory with great joy.  Jude 24

Bernard describes the steps to sin, and how it grows stronger.  ‘At first it is only a possibility, then more probable, but still a heavy task.  Next it is easy, and then light, and sweet, and at last necessary.’  What was at first just a possibility is now impossible to be omitted.  St Augustine spoke of his own mother, who, by sipping of the cup of wine at first, learnt at last to take the whole cup.  He who makes a small matter of small sins is in danger of falling into the greater.  Every fall multiplies the sinner’s account by ten times more.  Even the godly are subject to a fall.  We are bidden to take heed lest we fall (1 Cor. 10:12), and ‘take up the whole armor of God, that you may be able to withstand in the evil day’(Eph 6:13).  Even the very elect have this seen within them.  Peter would have been winnowed as chaff, if Christ had not prayed his faith would not fail (Luke 22:31-32).  Yet a truly regenerate soul rooted in Christ can never fall away totally or finally; Peter could not, and the elect can not.  They are as Mount Zion that cannot be moved, and a house built upon a rock.  We do daily combat, but God’s election stands firm, his love is unchangeable, and his call without change.  Christ keeps his sheep to the end and none shall pluck them out of his hand.  How can we keep from falling so we do not crucify afresh the Son the God and tread on his blood?  Watch and pray that you do not enter into temptation.  Keep your conscience tender and flee the first motion and occasion of sin.  Don’t think of sin as a little thing and don’t take mercy for granted.  Don’t rust in your won strength.  Don’t trust in light repentance.  True repentance flees further stumblings.  Remember that yielding to sin increases its power to rise higher.  Every time the bone is broken, the mending is more difficult and the limp more pronounced.

 

Daily Prayer and Praise

 

The Psalms are not only to be used in church but at home. They were individual songs before they became a means of congregational prayer and praise. Will not their sincere and regular use by individuals and families contribute to greater awe and joy in the church’s worship of the Triune God?

In these volumes Henry Law divides the Psalter into easily managed portions for each day. He plumbs the depths of the believer’s soul and soars at the wonder of Christ’s identification with his people.

Price includes both Volume 1 and 2.

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