May 17

 

If then you have been raised with Christ, seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God.    Colossians 3:1

 

Unbelievers seek their happiness in things of the world.  Believers find their happiness in God.  It is contrary to the nature of faith for a believer to seek peace in his earthly enjoyments.  Our present pilgrimage is a prison, yet alas, we too commonly do this.  By this we kill our comforts and then complain they are missing.  It is folly to expect any stable peace or solid joy that does not come from Christ as the fountain.  O that Christians would learn to live with one eye on Christ crucified and the other on his coming in glory!  If everlasting joys were more in your thoughts, spiritual joys would abound more in your hearts.  No wonder you are comfortless when heaven is forgotten.  When Christians let fall their heavenly expectations but heighten their earthly desires, they are preparing themselves for fear and trouble.  Who has met with a distressed, complaining soul, where either a low expectation of heavenly blessings, or too high a hope for joy on earth is not present?  What keeps us under trouble is either we do not expect what God has promised, or we expect what he did not promise.  We are grieved at crosses, losses, wrongs of our enemies, unkind dealings of our friends, sickness, or for contempt and scorn in the world.  But who encouraged you to expect any better?  Was it prosperity, riches, credit, and friends that God called for you to believe?  Do you have any promises for these things in his Word?  If you make a promise to yourself, and then your own promise deceives you, whom should you blame for that?  We have less comfort in earthly things because we have too high an expectation from them.  Alas, when will we learn from Scripture and providence to seek far more from God, and far less from the earth?

 

 

Worldly Saints: The Puritans as They Really Were

 

 

Dr. Ryken’s presentation of the Puritan view and style of life is perceptive and accurate. He allows the Puritans to speak for themselves on topics ranging from “Church and Worship” to “Money” and “Marriage and Sex.” Worldly Saints offers a fine introduction to seventeenth-century Puritanism in its English and American contexts. The work is rich in quotations from Puritan worthies and is ideally suited to general readers who have not delved widely into Puritan literature.

 

Endorsements:

 

“Ryken’s Worldly Saints offers a fine introduction to seventeenth-century Puritanism in its English and American contexts. The work is rich in quotations from Puritan worthies and is ideally suited to general readers who have not delved widely into Puritan literature. It will also be a source of information and inspiration to those who seek a clearer understanding of the Puritan roots of American Christianity.” —Harry Stout (Yale University)

 

“…the typical Puritans were not wild men, fierce and freaky, religious fanatics and social extremists, but sober, conscientious, and cultured citizens, persons of principle, determined and disciplined, excelling in the domestic virtues, and with no obvious shortcomings save a tendency to run to words when saying anything important, whether to God or to man. At last the record has been put straight.” —J.I. Packer (Regent College)

 

“Worldly Saints provides a revealing treasury of primary and secondary evidence for understanding the Puritans, who they are, what they believed, and how they acted. This is a book of value and interest for scholars and students, clergy and laity alike.” —Roland Mushat Frye (University of Pennsylvania)

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