October 4

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.  John 3:16

 

Love is the most comfortable attribute in God, and the best name by which we know him (1 John 4:16).  Love acts with a priority to all other attributes.  Wisdom plans the happiness for man, and power and providence bring it to pass, but love has the first hand in the work.  It was love that first summoned the great counsel held by all three persons in Elohim before man or angels existed.  Love marked the Sin as the foundation of the world structure of man’s salvation and blessedness.  Love sent Christ into the world, put him to death, and made him an offering for sin.  All the attributes of God act in the motions of love.  Electing love is the proper source of all our other mercies (Eph. 1).  He has chosen us before the foundation of the world, bestowed grace freely upon us and has given us redemption through his blood.  Paul lays all these blessings at the feet of electing love (verse 11).  Love is the only attribute that God has acted out to the utmost.  We have never seen the utmost of his power, but we have seen the utmost of his love.  He has tabernacle divinity in flesh (1 Tim. 3:16).  He has made his soul an offering for sin, and laid upon him the iniquity of us all (Isa. 53:10-11).  He has made us the righteousness of God in him (1 Cor. 5:21); he has made us sit together in the heavenly places in Christ (Eph. 2:6), and written our names in heaven.  How can divine love put forth any greater effort of love than this?  It is infinite love and it gives the soul an interest in an infinite good.  It entitles it to an infinitely blessedness, and fills the soul with infinite satisfaction.  Is not having an interest in this electing love the highest cause for rejoicing?  Love gives us a ‘name in heaven’, which causes eternal rejoicing.

 

Daily Prayer and Praise

 

The Psalms are not only to be used in church but at home. They were individual songs before they became a means of congregational prayer and praise. Will not their sincere and regular use by individuals and families contribute to greater awe and joy in the church’s worship of the Triune God?

In these volumes Henry Law divides the Psalter into easily managed portions for each day. He plumbs the depths of the believer’s soul and soars at the wonder of Christ’s identification with his people.

Price includes both Volume 1 and 2.

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