June 5

For everyone who has been born of God overcomes the world. And this is the victory that has overcome the world – our faith.  1 John 5:4

In the experience of God’s people, it is often found that when their outward condition is troubled, their inward state is full of perplexities and fears.  In affliction Satan seeks to make a breach between us and God.  He is most malicious to those with whom he has little hope of victory, as in Job’s case.  If he cannot run us on a rock, he will seek to upset us with a tempest.  If he cannot rob us of grace, he will seek to disturb our peace and comfort.  Believers can expect inward and outward trouble because we have married Christ with his cross.  We are delivered from the curse indeed, but are appointed to the cross. Outward afflictions may be many and heavy, and come upon the neck of another.  We may feel the hard brunt enough to exercise our whole strength of faith and patience.  Inward afflictions are far more heavy and grievous than afflictions of the body, for a wounded spirit who can bear?  It is not unusual thought, that both of these rods come upon us at once, as a load on a broken back.  What shall we do?  We must take a hold on God by renewed acts of faith.  Faith is used not only for our entrance into grace, but also for our continuance and progress through all temptations and difficulties.  Faith and prayer must be as the breathing of our souls to keep the heart alive.  We must trust the Lord in every change and condition of life.  I will lay the weight of my sinking spirit on the free grace of Christ.  I will renew my hold, life, and expectations there.  This is the path.  I will never be turned from it.  A trusting Christian in this strength my challenge all the gates of hell.  ‘When I am afraid, I put y trust in you’ (Psa. 56:3).  Afraid?  Alas!  Who is not?  But what course will you take then?  Believe.  Use faith always, and have it now!

 

Daily Prayer and Praise

 

The Psalms are not only to be used in church but at home. They were individual songs before they became a means of congregational prayer and praise. Will not their sincere and regular use by individuals and families contribute to greater awe and joy in the church’s worship of the Triune God?

In these volumes Henry Law divides the Psalter into easily managed portions for each day. He plumbs the depths of the believer’s soul and soars at the wonder of Christ’s identification with his people.

Price includes both Volume 1 and 2.

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