November 15

 

O Lord, open my lips, and my mouth will declare your praise. Psalm 51:15

 

By asking the Lord to open his lips, David showed how difficult it is to offer thanks to God.  This is something God demands of us (Psalm 50:14).  Talking about the Lord and thanking him publicly require an extreme amount of courage and strength, because the devil is constantly trying to stop us from doing this.  If we could see all of Satan’s traps, we would know why David prayed for the Spirit’s strength and asked the Lord himself to open David’s lips.  He wanted to tell the Devil, the world, kings, princes, and everyone about the Lord.

Many things can keep our lips shut: the fear of danger, the hope of gaining something, or even the advice of friends.  The devil uses these ways to stop us from offering thanks to God, as I have often experienced in my life.  And yet, at important times, when God’s honor was threatened, God stood by me and opened my mouth in spite of the obstacles.  The Spirit urges us on – just as Peter says, “We cannot help speaking about what we have seen and heard” (Acts 4:20).  The Spirit prays to God for us with many groans (Romans 8:26).   Then the Lord opens our lips to announce his praise.

Whenever Scripture talks about praising God publicly, it’s talking about something extremely dangerous.  This is because announcing his praise is nothing other than opposing the devil, the world, our own sinful nature, and everything evil.  For how can you praise God without first declaring that the world is guilty and condemned?  All who condemn the world are asking to be hated and put themselves in a very dangerous situation.

 

 

Life of Luther

 

Barnas Sears, D.D.

 

An historic and comprehensive biography of early Christianity’s most influential leader of the Protestant Reformation, Martin Luther.

 

Controversial and visionary, Luther’s life is revealed in this rare presentation of his work as an educator and church leader. From his birth and childhood, to his religious education, and the events leading up to the Protestant Reformation, you will discover the views and experiences that led to his excommunication by the Pope in 1520. Correspondence and accounts shed further light on Luther’s defiant translation of the Bible from Latin to the language of the common man.

This unique biography is reproduced from an 1850 American Sunday School Union original, and in it you will be introduced to the pivotal life of this enigmatic man before, during, and after one of Christianity’s defining events.

 

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