July 8

 Continue steadfastly in prayer, being watchful in it with thanksgiving   Colossians 4:2

Distractions of thought haunt us in prayer.  We are set to seek God, but it is impossible to shut the windows to keep out all of the wind.  If distractions are resisted, God will gather up the broken fragments of our prayers and mercy and answer us.  Our thoughts stray in and out like a spaniel that runs up and down, and then returns to his master.  What causes these vain thoughts in our prayers? (1.)  Satan is at our right hand ready to resist us in prayer.  He will be sure to disturb us, seeking to take the edge off our affections, or to divert our mind.  He is afraid of prayer, and seeks to cheat us of our prayers.  We need to stand guard.  (2.)  We are restless creatures.  It is difficult for all of us to concentrate on one object for any length of tie.  We are tossed up and down like a dried leaf before the wind.  He is a stranger to God and his own heart who does not find it so daily.  (3.)  We are distracted by practical atheism.  We have little sense of the unseen world of spirits.  Things we see have a greater force upon us than the true God who is Spirit and invisible power.  He is far off from our sight and apprehension.  (4.)  Lust rooted in us will also distract us when we go about any duty.  The covetous man about the world, the fleshly about his pleasures, and the ambitious about his honours, will surely draw away our attention.  (5.)  Fancy and curiosity offered us by the senses or memory, will be an occasion for diversion.  (6.)  Sharp worries will hinder our faith and draw away our attention from prayer.  We must be like priests, who went on with their sacrifices as the roman troops broke into Jerusalem.  All others fled this way and that, but the priests, as if they heard nothing, continued preferring their duty before safety as Rome rushed in on them with their swords.

Daily Prayer and Praise

The Psalms are not only to be used in church but at home. They were individual songs before they became a means of congregational prayer and praise. Will not their sincere and regular use by individuals and families contribute to greater awe and joy in the church’s worship of the Triune God?

In these volumes Henry Law divides the Psalter into easily managed portions for each day. He plumbs the depths of the believer’s soul and soars at the wonder of Christ’s identification with his people.

Price includes both Volume 1 and 2.

Continue Reading on