May 6

 

And because of him you are in Christ Jesus, who became to us wisdom from God, righteousness and sanctification and redemption,    1 Corinthians 1:30

 

The Lord Jesus Christ with all his precious benefits, becomes ours by his special and effectual application.  When the efficacy of Christ’s death and resurrection are effectively applied to the heart of any man, he cannot but turn from sin to God.  He becomes a new creature, living and acting by new principles and rules.  He does not naturally have wisdom, righteousness, sanctification and redemption.  These come to him from outside himself, even from Christ who is made all this to a sinner.  No creature comes into the world under more natural weakness than man.  All our excellencies are borrowed excellencies (1 Cor. 4:7).  What intolerable pride and vanity would it be for a man that wears the rich and costly robe of Christ’s righteousness, to parade proudly up and down in the world as if he himself had made it.  There is not one thread of his own spinning, but all was made by free grace.  O man, all your excellencies are borrowed from Christ!  Holy men take care when they view their own gracious principles, or their best performances, to disclaim themselves, and their own free grace a the sole author of it all.  Thus, holy Paul, in viewing the principles of the divine life in himself, denied the least part of the praise and glory belonging to him: ‘It is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me’ (Gal. 2:20).  When Paul, in a just and necessary defence, was constrained to mention the duties he performed for God (and what mere man ever did more for God than Paul?), how carefully he adds: ‘I worked harder than any of them, though it was not I, but the grace of God that is with me’ (1 Cor. 15:10).  Well then, let the sense of your own emptiness endear you all the more to Christ from whom you have received all.

 

 

Worldly Saints: The Puritans as They Really Were

 

 

Dr. Ryken’s presentation of the Puritan view and style of life is perceptive and accurate. He allows the Puritans to speak for themselves on topics ranging from “Church and Worship” to “Money” and “Marriage and Sex.” Worldly Saints offers a fine introduction to seventeenth-century Puritanism in its English and American contexts. The work is rich in quotations from Puritan worthies and is ideally suited to general readers who have not delved widely into Puritan literature.

 

Endorsements:

 

“Ryken’s Worldly Saints offers a fine introduction to seventeenth-century Puritanism in its English and American contexts. The work is rich in quotations from Puritan worthies and is ideally suited to general readers who have not delved widely into Puritan literature. It will also be a source of information and inspiration to those who seek a clearer understanding of the Puritan roots of American Christianity.” —Harry Stout (Yale University)

 

“…the typical Puritans were not wild men, fierce and freaky, religious fanatics and social extremists, but sober, conscientious, and cultured citizens, persons of principle, determined and disciplined, excelling in the domestic virtues, and with no obvious shortcomings save a tendency to run to words when saying anything important, whether to God or to man. At last the record has been put straight.” —J.I. Packer (Regent College)

 

“Worldly Saints provides a revealing treasury of primary and secondary evidence for understanding the Puritans, who they are, what they believed, and how they acted. This is a book of value and interest for scholars and students, clergy and laity alike.” —Roland Mushat Frye (University of Pennsylvania)

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