According to standard evolutionary models, the earth is supposed to be 4.5 billion years old, and its continents supposedly formed 3.5 billion years ago. But if this is true, why haven’t earth’s landforms been completely eroded and deposited into the seas?

A new study indicates that the earth’s overall erosion rate, although slow, would have leveled the continents at least 70 times over if they are as old as the evolutionary claim maintains!

Geologists have been measuring quantities of 10Be, an isotope of the element beryllium that becomes radioactive with exposure to the sun. The more 10Be that is present at a given site, the longer it has been exposed to the sun without being carried off by erosion. This system was used by dozens of geologists to estimate erosion rates around the world.

The study, which was published by the Geological Society of America,1 showed the collated10Be data from every continent. The researchers painstakingly converted all the reports to directly comparable units and found that erosion occurs 18 times faster in drainage basins than it does in outcrops.

According to the study, the average erosion rate for outcrops was 40 feet every one million years. The average thickness of continental crust above sea level can be estimated at about 623 meters, or 2,044 feet.2 To erode 2,000 feet of crust at 40 feet per one million years would require only 50 million years. So, if the earth is billions of years old, why is its surface not completely flat?….

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