A new cache of fossils found in Arlington, Texas, contains plenty of clues that are best explained by Noah’s Flood.

More specifically, the circumstances surrounding these remains match a hypothesis proposed by creation scientist Michael Oard that describes how swamp plants and land creatures could have mixed with sea creatures several months into the year-long Flood.

According to Scripture, five months passed after the Flood began before its waters had completely covered the earth (Genesis 7:24). By then, all air-breathing, land-dwelling creatures not on board the Ark were dead or dying. According to Oard, the interiors of continents may have been the last land areas to be submerged after being repeatedly washed by successive wave-like surges. Water and land levels fluctuated, and desperate, starving creatures made their last stands on temporary barren mud flats.

Oard first described his hypothesis in 1997: “It is more reasonable that dinosaurs found a linear strip of land (or a series of shoals separated by shallow water) during the Flood while the sea level was oscillating and sediments were being deposited.”1 He gave an updated description in his 2011 book Dinosaur Challenges and Mysteries, where he wrote, “Patches of newly laid sediments briefly emerged from the water during the Flood due to a local fall in relative sea level.”2

University of Texas at Arlington adjunct instructor Derek Main co-authored a description of the Arlington fossil site in the journal Palaois that provides clues that seem to fit Oard’s hypothesis.3 First, the creatures were deposited by sediment-carrying flood waters that travelled long distances. The Arlington remains include bones of dinosaur, turtle, and now-extinct crocodile forms. They also include many fish, including shark fossils. The Palaois authors noted that since all these did not normally live in the same place, they must have been washed in from far away….

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