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Category: Environment

  • One-Hour Oil Production

    By: Brian Thomas, M.S.* Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Washington State have pioneered a new technology that makes diesel fuel from algae—and their cutting-edge machine produces the fuel in just minutes. The recipe seems surprisingly straightforward: … Continue reading

  • Giant compound eyes, half a billion years ago?

    by Jonathan Sarfati We have already reported on the intriguing extinct giant invertebrate predator called Anomalocaris.1 This was a bit like a huge shrimp about 1-metre (3-foot) long (and it could grow to twice that), with spiked arms and a donut-shaped mouth full … Continue reading

  • Did Zebras Invent Their Own Stripes?

    By David Coppedge The explanations some evolutionists give for fur and feather patterns sound like tales of talking animals planning out their new fashion lines. Evolution tries to explain not just what is, but how it got that way.  The core of Darwin’s … Continue reading

  • Fulfilling the Genesis Mandate While Helping the Poor

    by James J. S. Johnson, J.D., Th.D. Aquaculture expert Jon Steeves recently helped an African community establish a fish farm to supply local food needs—a wonderful example of biblical multitasking through obeying the Genesis mandate while also serving and loving … Continue reading

  • Geologists Warming Up to Catastrophic Floods

    By David Coppedge Megafloods larger than anything seen today are better concepts for explaining certain features on Earth and Mars. Space.com and Live Science reported that megaflood theory is helping explain a large canyon in solid basalt in Idaho.  Niagara Falls is a … Continue reading

  • The bacterium that came in from the cold

    by Jonathan O’Brien Some animals live for 200 years or more, and there are trees which live much longer still.1,2 But here’s a story about an organism which, some scientists say, trumps them all. There have been several recent claims that scientists … Continue reading

  • Fossil Coral ‘Reefs’ Among Rock Strata

    by John D. Morris, Ph.D. In certain regions geologists find what appear to be fossilized coral reefs either buried in deep underground strata or exposed on the earth’s surface. If these reefs really took millions of years to form, they … Continue reading

  • Which Came First–the Spear or its Thrower?

    by Brian Thomas, M.S. Scientists age-dated a cache of stone-tipped throwing spears unearthed from Ethiopia’s Gademotta Formation at 280,000 years old. This find appears to pierce the conventional story of human evolution—a narrative about modern man evolving from some pre-human … Continue reading

  • ISON Died a Customary Comet Death

    By David Coppedge Comet ISON was not unusual for breaking up and sputtering to a fiery end.  That’s in comets’ nature. Hopes for a big show by the advertised “comet of the century” came to a dismal end as Comet ISON broke up after its … Continue reading

  • Look Up, Look Down at Natural Design

    By David Coppedge Swimmers, flyers, and things that just sit in the sun are the envy of bioengineers. Silent flyers:  How do owls sneak up on their prey in the dark?  The secrets of the near noiseless flight of owls … Continue reading

  • Cosmic Lottery: How Many Habitable Planets?

    By David Coppedge News media ran with a suggestion that one in five stars has a habitable planet, but they didn’t read the fine print. Here’s how it came out in the mainstream media: “One in five suns has habitable world: Astronomers … Continue reading

  • Beetles … nature’s workaholics

    by Paula Weston Although many of us may prefer to keep our distance from beetles, a close look at these tireless toilers is a rewarding exercise. Coming in all shapes and sizes, beetles are part of the largest order of insects.1 The … Continue reading

  • Clarifying the magmatic model for the origin of salt deposits

    Answering criticisms by Stef Heerema Editorial explanation: The origin of the vast salt deposits of the world has traditionally been explained by evaporation of enormous volumes of seawater over millions of years. In 2009, Stef Heerema published an alternate model whereby the … Continue reading

  • Counting Earth’s Age in Lightning Strikes

    by Brian Thomas, M.S. Scientists recently studied the Drakensberg Range in South Africa, discovering that lightning likely damages mountain surfaces far more often than previously thought. Lightning also generates fulgarites, and these two finds call into question old age assignments … Continue reading

  • Bugs Use Mechanical Gears To Help Them Jump

    By R. L. David Jolly Have you ever watched a leafhopper or planthopper bug jump?  They jump so fast and so far for such a small insect.   For years, scientists were baffled as to how they were able to jump … Continue reading

  • A thorny issue

    by David Catchpoole “Cursed is the ground because of you … It will produce thorns and thistles” Genesis 3:17–18 Spiny plant fossils pose a thorny problem for Christians who accept the secular view that the earth is much older than 6,000 years. … Continue reading

  • Vicious Crocodile Attacks Helpless Fruit

    By David Coppedge An evolutionist was surprised to find wild crocodiles eating fruit.  He has a lesson for scientists. A short video clip on The Conversation shows a crocodile at the zoo catching a watermelon with its gaping mouth and instantly smashing … Continue reading

  • Human-like Fossil Menagerie Stuns Scientists

    by Brian Thomas, M.S., & Frank Sherwin, M.A. An international team of scientists made a stunning and controversial discovery from an archaeological site in Dmanisi, a small town in the country of Georgia, that is forcing some scientists to unlearn everything they … Continue reading

  • Tyrannosaurus rex: Scavenger or Predator?

    by Tim Clarey, Ph.D. Tyrannosaurus rex looms in recent history as likely the most famous dinosaur that ever lived. The Jurassic Park movies pumped new life into its image as a savage predator. But how much of this is Hollywood hype and how … Continue reading

  • Did Sea Slugs Evolve to Steal Genes?

    by Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D. Solar-powered sea slugs (sacoglossan molluscs) feed on filamentous algae, a water plant, to capture photosynthetic organelles called chloroplasts and use them for solar energy. Considered kleptoplastic because they “steal” from another organism, sea slugs have been suspected of … Continue reading

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