Dragonflies dart with exceeding dexterity as they avoid obstacles and prey on other flying insects. This is made possible by the accuracy with which their eyes allow them to perceive their surroundings.

In fact, arthropods such as dragonflies and shrimp have some of the best optical equipment in the known world.1 If these advanced visual systems resulted from millions of years of evolutionary trial and error, one would expect to see a progression of simple-to-complicated eyes in fossils ascending earth’s rock layers. But fully formed, advanced compound eyes have now been discovered on Australia’s Kangaroo Island among Cambrian fossils—far too early to fit the evolutionary story.

The eye fossils featured tiny indentations that exactly matched the small surface features of many modern arthropod compound eyes. They were found in a gray mudstone and not attached to any bodies, but they looked very much like shrimp eyes. Compound eyes such as these contain many rows of individual wedge-shaped units called ommatidia, each with its own lens. In a report published in Nature, the study authors said, “The lenses are not only very numerous and large, they are also hexagonally arranged in a highly regular six-neighbour arrangement: the densest and most efficient packing pattern.”2

A University of Adelaide online video described the Cambrian compound eye as “surprisingly advanced in many respects. It shows that primitive creatures rapidly evolved powerful vision during the ‘Cambrian explosion.'”3 This “explosion” refers to the sudden appearance of representatives from every single animal phylum—alive or extinct—in the lowermost fossil-bearing Cambrian rocks, which evolutionists insist were deposited over 500 million years ago. But is “rapid evolution” really what this fossil shows?….

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