According to Genesis, all creatures of the earth were created within days of each other—including dinosaurs and humans. A common question in response to this is “If dinosaurs and man lived at the same time, why aren’t their fossils found together?”

Bird bones and egg shell fossil fragments from a waterside bird colony are sending clues from the long-ago past to help solve this quandary.

The fossilized colony found in Romania was apparently a victim of a watery disaster. Despite their toothed beaks and small claws, the birds looked very much like modern water fowl. The Cretaceous strata in which they were found also contained herbivorous dinosaurs and other creatures.

Researchers theorized that the nest must have been near a river or other body of water. When it flooded, “the water sweeping across the colony picked up broken eggshell, any remaining eggs and birds, and carried them a few meters across to a shallow depression, perhaps present on the other side of the colony,” the University of Southampton’s Darren Naish told Discovery News.1

The remains were found “buried under layers of sediment,” and according to Naish, “the flooding was actually a quick ‘swamping’ or ‘drowning.'”1 Ducks can fly faster than 60 miles per hour, so if the extinct birds were anything like ducks, the mud waters that buried them must have moved significantly faster.2

Naish explained that the ancient catastrophe overtook “cow-sized plant-eating dinosaurs, a bird-like predatory dinosaur known as Balaur, rodent-like mammals, and one of the world’s largest pterosaurs,” since their remains appear together.1 (Despite this assertion, Balaur was not actually bird-like.3) Considering the natures of these various creatures, it makes sense that they lived in or near a swamp with plenty of water and vegetation….

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