Where do physical traits such as height and eye color come from? Biologists say these characteristics are phenotypic (physical) expressions of the genotype—the genetic code. The case for creation can be seen in this amazing genetic code of life. The human body’s trillions of cells use over 75 special kinds of protein and RNA molecules to make one protein following DNA’s detailed instructions. A second genetic code has recently been discovered, adding to the complexity of the already intricate molecule of heredity.1

What was the origin of this code? Was it through chance and time (evolution) or design and organization (creation)? The materialistic explanation (evolution) is the antithesis of biblical creation. Could the origin of the genetic code be just a random event? Hardly.2 In fact, a chance origin of biological information is considered by those involved in such research to be inadequate.3 Advocates of evolution must attempt a purely secular explanation of what is quite obviously an intricately and exquisitely designed code. Such explanations are not sufficient, and never will be, outside of the One who created the genetic code.

Evolutionary scientists cannot agree on their theories of the origin of the genetic code. Adam Kun et al stated, “The origin of the genetic code is still not fully understood, despite considerable progress in the last decade.”4 In 2008, an evolutionist from Kazakhstan, Vladimir shCherbak, published a paper asserting the strange idea of an arithmetical origin of the genetic code.5 Arithmetic is the science of computing and is the oldest, most elementary branch of the larger field of mathematics. Roman arithmetic required the use of a counting board, the ancestor of the abacus. shCherbak suggested that a primeval counting frame was responsible for the origin of the genetic code.

He claimed the genetic code contains “the zero, decimal syntax and unique summations” and that this refutes “traditional ideas about the stochastic origin of the genetic code.”6….

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