Our moon is unique in the solar system.  Just the right size and just the right distance, it is positioned to stabilize the tilt of Earth’s axis, providing stable seasonal cycles.  Science lacks data so far to know just how unique the Earth-moon relationship in a habitable zone is among other stellar systems.  We know from the planets of our own solar system that moons come in all sizes, from tiny Deimos to massive Titan, and orbit in apparently arbitrary radii from their host planets.  What astrophysicists can do is predict what would happen on earth if things were different.  That’s what one scientist did.  Another discovery could change the view of the moon’s surface being unaltered for billions of years.

PhysOrg reported a thought experiment by Neil F. Comins, author of a book entitled, What If the Earth Had Two Moons? (see title on Amazon.com).  First, consider why we should be glad to have just one:

Our Earth-Moon system is unique in the solar system. The Moon is 1/81 the mass of Earth while most moons are only about 3/10,000 the mass of their planet. The size of the Moon is a major contributing factor to complex life on Earth. It is responsible for the high tides that stirred up the primordial soup of the early Earth, it’s the reason our day is 24 hours long, it gives light for the variety of life forms that live and hunt during the night, and it keeps our planet’s axis tilted at the same angle to give us a constant cycle of seasons.

A second moon would change that….

 

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